Seville Orange Marmalade

Seville Orange Marmalade

Two of my favourite things are the stunningly beautiful city of Seville and the cute little marmalade sandwich nibbling bear, Paddington. To celebrate my upcoming trip, Paddington’s first foray onto the silver screen, and the relaunch of my site, I’m going to share an extra recipe this week.

Gorgeously bitter Seville oranges are only available in January and February, so this is the ideal time to stock up on marmalade for the rest of the year.  The recipe is very easy – only 4 ingredients if you include the water.

Seville Orange Marmalade
Print Recipe
A deliciously bittersweet orange marmalade
Servings Prep Time
4 x 500ml jars 30 minutes (plus overnight soaking)
Cook Time Passive Time
2.5 - 3 hours 10 minutes
Servings Prep Time
4 x 500ml jars 30 minutes (plus overnight soaking)
Cook Time Passive Time
2.5 - 3 hours 10 minutes
Seville Orange Marmalade
Print Recipe
A deliciously bittersweet orange marmalade
Servings Prep Time
4 x 500ml jars 30 minutes (plus overnight soaking)
Cook Time Passive Time
2.5 - 3 hours 10 minutes
Servings Prep Time
4 x 500ml jars 30 minutes (plus overnight soaking)
Cook Time Passive Time
2.5 - 3 hours 10 minutes
Ingredients
  • 1 kg Seville oranges (2 lbs)
  • 1.5 kg Demerara sugar (3 lbs)
  • 1 Lemon (juice only)
  • 2.5 l Water (10 cups)
Servings: x 500ml jars
Instructions
  1. Scrub the oranges, then juice them. Keep juice in a separate container. Slice the pith and peel to your desired thickness. Once all the peel has been sliced, put in a large container, cover with the juice and 2.5l of water, and leave overnight.
  2. Add all the orange peel, juice and water mixture to the largest pan you own (or can beg, borrow or steal - I'm lucky enough to have a maslin pan which is obviously perfect for marmalade making). Bring the mixture to a boil and simmer for a couple of hours until the peel has softened and the mixture reduced by around one third.
  3. Add the sugar and lemon juice, bring to the boil, stirring until the sugar has dissolved. Keep the mixture going at a rapid boil for another 20 minutes or so until it reaches setting point. This can be tested by putting some on a cold plate, and cooing for a couple of minutes - the marmalade should have some stability and sort of "wrinkle up" when you nudge it.
  4. Allow to cool for 10 minutes then pour into warm sterilised jars. This recipe should yield around 2 litres of marmalade and keep until the oranges are available again next year.
Recipe Notes

If you wish, once the marmalade is completely cold (I left mine until the following day), use kitchen roll to dry off any condensation on the inside of the lids.

If you are unable to get Seville oranges, any bitter oranges will do.

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3 comments

  1. Lisa Kaufer-Smithey

    It looks delicious! Thanks for the pictures also. As a visual person, ME, they will help. Now all I need are some cute glass jars like yours.

    • Thanks Lisa and Linda. I hope you both get a chance to make some – so much nicer than the shop bought stuff. It has the added bonus of making the kitchen smell amazing when it’s bubbling away as well.

  2. Great recipe!
    Hopefully the Sevilles will still be around at the end of Feb, when I will have more time to buy equipment and fruit.
    Good luck with the new site/blog, Lisa

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